You searched for: Journal Applied and environmental microbiology Remove constraint Journal: Applied and environmental microbiology Publication Year 2002 Remove constraint Publication Year: 2002 Source 2002 v 68 no 3 Remove constraint Source: 2002 v 68 no 3 Key physiological properties contributing to rhizosphere adaptation and plant growth promotion abilities of Azospirillum brasilense Sharon Fibach-Paldi Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology and The Otto Warburg Minerva Center for Agricultural Biotechnology The Robert H Smith Faculty of Agriculture Food and Environment The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Rehovot Israel

Human selection and the relaxation of legume defences

Both strains were grown for 8 days in a rotary shaker until late exponential growth phase (A 420 =0 5–1 5) and samples were plated to determine cell densities One hundred millilitres of the cultures were injected into 250 g of irradiated sterile peat to grow for four weeks

seedling growth and foliar N response resulting after an amino acid supply was similar to inorganic N applications only when the organic form was applied at rates two or three times higher than that of the inorganic form ( Wilson et al 2013 ) The N form provided in the growth substrate affects not only plant growth but also plant biomass allocation Amino acids were suggested to have a

Rhizobia nitrogen-fixing bacteria associated with legumes often confer fitness benefits to their host plants by increasing access to nitrogen in nitrogen-limited soils but effects of rhizobia on host fitness under other stresses such as drought remain unclear METHODS: In this greenhouse study we varied the application of rhizobia (Bradyrhizobium sp ) inoculum and drought to examine

23/06/2018Cells grown in peat generally survive desiccation better than cells grown in liquid broth We aimed to identify peat-induced proteomic changes in rhizobia that may be linked to desiccation tolerance Proteins expressed differentially after growth in peat extract when compared with a minimal defined medium were measured in four rhizobial strains

The effect of water deficit on growth and some physiological and biochemical parameters related to water deficit tolerance was studied in 4 Moroccan alfalfa Medicago sativa L populations that originated from the mountains and oases of Morocco The experiment was conducted in greenhouse conditions Seeds were allowed to germinate in pots filled with sand and peat at a 2:1 ratio respectively

African Journal of Microbiology Research

Exopolysaccharides (EPS) may represent a viable inoculant carrier to replace peat and reduce production costs In addition the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) as Paenibacillus in association with rhizobia represents a new technology that can improve the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and crop productivity Thus the present research aimed to characterize the EPS that are

Physiological changes in rhizobia after growth in peat extract may be related to improved desiccation tolerance Authors: Andrea Casteriano Meredith A Wilkes Rosalind Deaker Appl Environ Microbiol 2013 Jul 19 79(13):3998-4007 Epub 2013 Apr 19 Faculty of Agriculture and Environment University of Sydney Sydney New South Wales Australia View Article Download full-text PDF Source http

When a moist formulation such as peat is used moisture content of 4050% proved optimal for growth and survival of a range of rhizobia (Deaker et al 2004) Consequently a practical solution for example to improve survival of rhizobia on seeds is a short curing period of 15 d at 25 C or an even longer curing time of up to 120 days which is better This curing favors adaptation of

Aqueous peat extract exposes rhizobia to sub-lethal stress which may prime cells for improved desiccation tolerance Authors: Mary Atieno Neil Wilson Andrea Casteriano Ben Crossett Didier Lesueur Rosalind Deaker Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2018 Sep 23 102(17):7521-7539 Epub 2018 Jun 23 School of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Sydney Sydney NSW Australia View Article

Growth at Physiological Maturity At physiological maturity leaves and pods in nitrogen deficient plots (uninoculated 102 104 rhizobia seed ‑1) had turned yellow and the leaves were beginning to fall In plots which had received 10 6 rhizobia seed-1 leaves in the top half of the plants were still green

their ability to improve the growth of non-legumes through several plant growth promoting attributes (Hussain et al 2009 Mehboob et al 2012 Hussain et al 2014a) Increased population of plant beneficial rhizobia in association with plant may bring some physiological changes leading towards induced systemic tolerance (IST)

01/08/2013Growth in peat extract also resulted in changes to polypeptide expression in both strains and peptide analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry indicated increased expression of stress response proteins Our results suggest that increased capacity for desiccation tolerance in rhizobia is multifactorial involving the accumulation of trehalose together with increased expression

situation may be rescued by inoculating drought tolerant rhizobia owing to their plant growth promotion attributes and high root colonization efficiency A pot experiment was conducted in sandy clay loam to assess the potential of four drought tolerant rhizobial strainsRhizobium phaseoli-RS-1 R phaseoli-RS-3 Mesorhizobium ciceri-RS-8 andM ciceri-RS-12 for ameliorating drought impact in

University of Sydney

Physiological Changes in Rhizobia after Growth in Peat Extract may be related to Improved Desiccation Tolerance i Applied and Environmental Microbiologyi0 79(13) 3998-4007 [More Information]} par pard ql sb20 sa80 {fs24 f0 b 2012} par pard ql sb20 sa80 {fs20 f0 Deaker R Hartley E Gemell G (2012) Conditions

A review on plant growth promoting rhizobacteria acting as bioinoculants and their biological approach towards the production of sustainable agriculture Vibha Nehra* and Madhu Choudhary1 * Department of Microbiology Kurukshetra University Kurukshetra-136 119 (Haryana) INDIA Division of Soil and Crop Management Central Soil Salinity Research Institute Karnal-132 001 (Haryana) INDIA

13/09/2007After the microbial suspension has been mixed well with the peat (e g by massaging or tumbling the bags) the bags are cured at a temperature in the range of 20 to 30 C for a period of 7 to 35 days prior to storage at ambient temperature If a sticking agent is incorporated into the peat prior to sterilization the composition can be directly applied to legume seeds or alternatively the

Exopolysaccharides (EPS) may represent a viable inoculant carrier to replace peat and reduce production costs In addition the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) as Paenibacillus in association with rhizobia represents a new technology that can improve the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and crop productivity Thus the present research aimed to characterize the EPS that are

The growth and persistence of rhizobia and bradyrhizobia in soils are negatively impacted by drought conditions In this study we used genome-wide transcriptional analyses to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the response of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to drought Desiccation of cells resulted in the differential expression of 15 to 20% of the 8 480 B japonicum open reading frames with

See also Plant growth promoting rhizobia: challenges and opportunities Plant growth promoting rhizobia: challenges and opportunities Microbial amelioration of crop salinity stress Microbial amelioration of crop salinity stress Physiological and biochemical responses

10/04/2010Physiological changes in rhizobia after growth in peat extract may be related to improved desiccation tolerance Applied and Environmental Microbiology 79 (13) 3998-4007 Published online ahead of print on April 19th 2013 Conference proceedings: CASTERIANO A WILKES M and DEAKER R (2012) Changes in desiccation tolerance polypeptide expression and morphology of Rhizobium

Aqueous peat extract exposes rhizobia to sub-lethal stress which may prime cells for improved desiccation tolerance Authors: Mary Atieno Neil Wilson Andrea Casteriano Ben Crossett Didier Lesueur Rosalind Deaker Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2018 Sep 23 102(17):7521-7539 Epub 2018 Jun 23 School of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Sydney Sydney NSW Australia View Article

Physiological changes in rhizobia after growth in peat extract may be related to improved desiccation tolerance Authors: Andrea Casteriano Meredith A Wilkes Rosalind Deaker Appl Environ Microbiol 2013 Jul 19 79(13):3998-4007 Epub 2013 Apr 19 Faculty of Agriculture and Environment University of Sydney Sydney New South Wales Australia View Article Download full-text PDF Source http